FB Pixel no script[Tuning In] Judith Julia Justin on providing unique rehabilitative therapy services for children with disabilities | KrASIA
MENU
KrASIA
Q&A

[Tuning In] Judith Julia Justin on providing unique rehabilitative therapy services for children with disabilities

Written by Taro Ishida Published on 

Share
Inspired by her son Jake, Judith is working hard to provide more physical therapy options in Singapore.

Two decades in the branding and communications business has given Judith Julia Justin the tenacity, smarts, and empathy to develop unique solutions for her clients during times of celebration and crisis. Little did she know that this experience would prove to be inspirational and invaluable. When her son Jake was born, Judith knew nothing about rehabilitation therapy. This changed quickly, as she struggled to find the right fit in therapy options for Jake, who suffered a severe hypoxic brain injury at birth. She was fortunate enough to be able to travel the world for treatments and therapies that could make a real difference to him. Over the years, Judith also sought training and became certified in physical therapy, NeuroSuit, the TheraSuit Method, and Cuevas Medek Exercises (CME). WINGS Therapy Center is her dream come to life, a place of hope that provides infants and children with cutting-edge physical therapy. Most recently, Judith was named as one of the “Great Women of 2018” by Singapore’s Women’s Weekly for her contribution to the public service and education sector.

This interview has been edited for brevity and clarity.

KrASIA (Kr): What is the story behind WINGS Therapy Center and the unique services you provide? 

Judith Julia Justin (JJJ): WINGS was founded in 2017, inspired by my son, Jake Knight. He was diagnosed with a rare genetic mutation called NACC1, and is one of 16 kids worldwide with it. Prior to that, he was diagnosed with quadriplegic cerebral palsy. Quadriplegic cerebral palsy is when the injury caused to the brain has affected all four limbs, vision, mode of speech, and hearing, sometimes. As the years went by, we found that he was different from other kids with cerebral palsy.

He was attending therapy services in Singapore, which were good but were not going to help him live a better life. They were maintenance services and I found them to be quite traditional. It accepted the child’s condition, but didn’t push them further. To begin with, I found stem cells therapy, so I whisked Jake away to China.

 

To continue reading this article, please hop to Oasis, by KrASIA. 

 

Share

Most PopularMost Popular

Videos

Video | These are China’s most valuable edtech startups

By James Chan

28 Jan 202108:00 AM

See All

Auto loading next article...

Loading...